Good and not so good news in brazilian economy: energy prices reduced

On one side, a weak economy, shaken by the international crisis. The other, a labor market where unemployment rates remain low, month after month. One scenario, against the core countries, which gets you air a question: how long will Brazil be able to hold their jobs? After all, Brazil in the first half rose just 0.6% – the lowest since the 2009 recession. And industry bitter a drop in production of 3.7% through July. According to analysts, the short supply of manpower, the dynamism of the service sector (which “steals” industry workers), and the expectation that the economy is going to grow back lead entrepreneurs to insure their employees, even before the crisis.
The accounts of the National Confederation of Industries in the last 12 months employment in the manufacturing industry is stable. And recorded the last three months vacancy. But, experts say, this waiting period is to end date. If measures to stimulate the economy the government – such as lower interest rates, tax benefits and the recently announced drop in energy prices – do not take effect until the end of the year, the status of country of full employment may be coming to an end and 2013 can now present a reversal in the trend of the unemployment rate. If the country does not grow back again, the labor market does not stand another year of growth below 2%, said an expert.

Minister of Communications said that reducing the cost of electricity will boost production in the country.

In the statement of 7 September, the Independence Day holiday in Brazil, President Dilma said that electricity bills will have an average reduction of 16.2% for companies and 28% for industries. The measures will come into force next year. Residential consumers will have an average reduction of 16.2%.
The reduction in electricity rates, from 2013, all consumers will benefit Brazilians and especially those who consume more, ie at a higher voltage. The average drop of 16.2% will apply to residences and for all consumers with voltage between 110 and 240 Volts, ie, small businesses, enterprises and small size buildings connected to the network. The largest percentage drop in rates will be applied in the industry, reaching 28%, as the president said.

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Joe Cloud
Dutch, American, Brazilian... lived there for 5 years and owns property in Brazil. Out of the country for a few years now and would like to go back, however current circumstances tell me it's not the right time.

Published by Joe Cloud

Dutch, American, Brazilian... lived there for 5 years and owns property in Brazil. Out of the country for a few years now and would like to go back, however current circumstances tell me it's not the right time.