Nintendo pulls out of the brazilian gaming market due to high taxes

Nintendo Wii over Brazilian FlagNintendo announced on January 9, 2015 that will not distribute any more games and consoles in Brazil. As of January 2015, Gaming of Brazil, the subsidiary company of Juegos de Video Latin America, no longer will distribute Nintendo products in Brazil. Gaming of Brazil distributed Nintendo’s products in the country for the past four years.

These challenges include high taxes on imports that apply to the gaming industry in Brazil and the decision not to have a local operation. Working together with the Juegos de Video Latinoamérica, Nintendo will monitor the evolution of the business environment in Brazil and evaluate the best way to serve Brazilian gaming fans in the future.

Despite the changes in Brazil, Juegos de Video Latinoamérica remains the distributor of Nintendo for Latin America. “We are partners in Nintendo’s distribution of its products in Latin America for 14 years and we remain committed to the brand. And while no other changes are planned for other markets in the region, we are in a position where we need to reevaluate our approach to distribution in Brazil, “explains Bernard Josephs, CEO of Juegos de Video Latin America to UOL Jogos.

It is not new that Nintendo’s relationship with Brazil is problematic. For more than a year it has been impossible for many people to buy content from the online store in Brazil.. That’s because Nintendo did not adapt themselves to the Brazilian banking regulation that prevents certain bank credit cards such as Bradesco, Itaú and Santander to do operations at online stores that feature prices in Real (R$), but charge in dollars.

Both Microsoft and Sony faced the same situation with their respective online stores for consoles, but managed to solve the problem and offer alternatives already in 2013.

Nintendo ensures that its withdrawal from the Brazilian market is “only temporary”, but they do not know which path they will take to re-distribute their products on Brazilian territory.

Brazilian gaming fans have shown mixed feelings online, some mentioning that Nintendo never cared about the brazilian market and others sad over the difficulty of doing business in the country.

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Max Francisco
Max Francisco has been involved with the Internet in Brazil and has been doing digital projects in the country for the last 15 years.

Published by Max Francisco

Max Francisco has been involved with the Internet in Brazil and has been doing digital projects in the country for the last 15 years.